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Churchill’s War, Vol II: Triumph in Adversity

£55.00


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David Irving’s standard work on the middle years of Winston Churchill and his war, based, like his work on Hitler, on documents exclusively available to him and thirty years of research and interviews and British and international archives. The second volume of Churchill’s War covers the middle years of this disastrous conflict. After the first volume chronicled an almost unbroken series of disasters in his life, from Gallipoli and the Chanak crisis to the defeat of France and the military fiasco in Greece, the second sees him enter happier times, with great naval victories, El Alamein and the landings in North Africa. This book is a “stand alone” book and does not require having read the first volume to understand or appreciate the story. Jacketed hardback.

The second volume of Churchill’s War covers the middle years of this disastrous conflict. After the first volume chronicled an almost unbroken series of disasters in his life, from Gallipoli and the Chanak crisis to the defeat of France and the military fiasco in Greece, the second sees him enter happier times, with great naval victories, El Alamein and the landings in North Africa.

The contract for the biography was signed with major British publishers in October 1972. The first volume appeared fifteen years later, in 1987, the second fourteen years after that. It benefits from the release to the public domain of thousands of files, including the most secret, which even the official biographer has been unable to see. In the next thirty years of its gestation, the world has turned, the landscape of history has shifted, and entire areas now tremble to the tread of the enforcers of political correctness.

Mr Irving himself is no longer the enfant gâté of the media. Publishers who fell over themselves in the 1970s to publish him now come under assault from international organisations if they even hint at doing so again. (The secret files of Macmillan Ltd show that in July 1992 – on the same day as the author was returning triumphant from the KGB archives in Moscow with the Goebbels diaries – their editors-in-chief took the decision, under outside pressure, to burn all his remaining works in secret.)

We hear in this volume odd stories about Mr Churchill’s habits of receiving his staff in a state of nudity, and no less quirky stories of another great prime minister’s habit of reaching decisions according to what the hands of the clock told him, or the voice of his long dead dog.

The human Winston Churchill reaches boldly out of this second volume, as from the first: bullying, bold, incorrigible, and callous, hectoring his own ministers but subservient to both Moscow and Washington and mindlessly sacrificing the British empire’s interests when those powers so dictated. The unpalatable picture that emerges of this war leader in Real History is unchallengeable – that he willingly fomented, prosecuted, and indeed prolonged the war against Hitler, not in pursuit of any fundamental British empire interest, for Britain and her empire were never threatened by Hitler’s Germany; but to acquire money and power after years in the wilderness and poverty; and that he was undismayed to see the British empire ruined in the process.

The volume reproduces a hundred photographs and documents, many in colour. In special appendices Mr Irving reveals that the two war leaders Roosevelt and Churchill maintained secret lines of communication, both by radiotelephone and through ultra-secret channels, through which they exchanged batches of messages most of which have still not been revealed.

“All images for illustrative purposes only and not necceasarily representative of the actual product itself”
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